The Toxins in Meat Every Biohacker & Paleo Dieter Should Know

too much protein
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If you’ve been reading the blog or listening to the podcast, you’re probably aware that the right kind of meat in the right amount helps to make you feel Bulletproof. Avoiding meat from healthy animals likely contributed to Steve Job’s death, to the performance decline of vegan athlete Carl Lewis, and is often a  reason people become deficient in key nutrients. The right kind of whey protein can boost muscle growth and support your immune system. In Upgraded™ Chef, some of the most popular recipes have enough meat to make any omnivore salivate. However, even the best sources of protein and fat can be bad for you in excess.

This is virtually unknown in mainstream diets, especially because the misguided “war on fat” encourages people to eat more lean meat. People on low fat, low carb diets by definition eat too much protein. I know this because I spent years doing low carb, moderate fat, moderate protein diets – and felt their effects – before biohacking and health what a high healthy fat diet low in toxins did for my energy, my health, and my cognitive performance.

Too Much Protein Can Be a Bad Thing

In an upcoming post, you will learn how consuming too much of certain amino acids can decrease your lifespan, but too much of any protein source can be bad for you in excess. Eating too much protein, especially along with a poor overall diet, can damage your cells, impair your cognitive performance, and decrease your longevity.

When you eat too much protein, your body can become overwhelmed by the task of digesting it. Unlike fats, which are cleanly burned in your cells, your body will try to oxidize the excess protein in your liver. This produces several major toxins that can decrease your performance and damage your health. This post will show you how these toxins are formed, what they do to your body, and how to avoid them, yet get enough protein to support optimal health and performance. Let’s examine our first bad guy…

4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE)

This is actually a derivative of oxidized omega-6 fats found in all of your cells. In small amounts, HNE is actually good for your cells. However, too much can cause serious problems. It’s been linked to chronic inflammation and various diseases including diabetes, cancer, atherosclerosis, and cognitive decline. Incidentally, this is one reason the Bulletproof Diet also recommends very low omega 6 oil intake.

The problem is that when you consume too much protein, your body is put into a state of inflammation, which drastically increases the fat oxidation in your cells. This tips your body’s production of HNE into the red zone, and overwhelms your cell’s detox pathways. It’s double jeopardy when that protein is red meat from soy and corn-fed animals, which is inconveniently wrapped in extra omega 6 oils. Yuck.

You can also absorb excess HNE from food. Almost all meat has some omega-6’s, and if you overcook it, you produce a ton of HNE toxins. These toxins are absorbed into your tissues and cause all of the problems listed above. In fact, for most people, overcooked meat is an even greater source of HNE than consuming too much protein.

Yet again, this is a reason the Bulletproof Diet recommends carefully cooked meat prepared at lower temperatures. It’s also one reason most studies on meat consumption and health are woefully inadequate – they fail to consider how the meat is cooked.

Malondialdehyde (MDA)

Malondialdehyde is very similar to HNE, in that it’s also produced from the oxidation of fats both inside and outside your cells. Like HNE, MDA damages your DNA and your mitochondria. Overcooking the fat in meat also produces MDA.

Acrolein

When fats in meat and proteins are heated, the glycerol in the fat breaks down into acrolein. Acrolein is another major toxin that is so volatile; it can even irritate the ears, nose and eyes on contact. It’s also a potent carcinogen and mutagen, which cause damage to your mitochondrial DNA. There is evidence that acrolein is one of the most carcinogenic compounds in cigarettes. We use it industrially at 10 parts per million to kill weeds and algae.

Glyoxal

Glyoxal is a form of advanced glycation end product, but it also comes from burned fats and protein. Glyoxal is another potent carcinogen that interrupts cellular signaling and damages your mitochondria. It’s often found in overcooked meat and oils, and is easily absorbed from your food.

Knowing this, do you really want that deep fried chicken wing?

How These Toxins Damage Your Performance

All of these toxins are different, but they share a few common mechanisms that derail your health and performance. They all damage your mitochondria and deplete your glutathione levels.

Your mitochondria are the power plants of your cells, and they’re essential for cognitive function, maintaining muscle mass, and generally being in a state of high performance. When your mitochondria are damaged, your cells don’t process oxygen as efficiently, and don’t metabolize fats or sugars as well.

As Danny Roddy and Ray Peat have writen, when cells aren’t able to process oxygen efficiently, or don’t have enough oxygen, they switch from oxidation to glycolysis, which is far less efficient. This process also produces lactic acid, which places stress on your liver. This can kick start a dangerous cycle where toxins damage your cells, which decreases liver function, which impairs your ability to remove toxins.

These toxins deplete your body of glutathione, which can place another stressor on your liver, and makes this cycle even worse. Glutathione depletion also decreases your cognitive performance, as glutathione is needed to shield your brain from inflammatory agents and other toxins.

These are some of the reasons I recommend breathing exercises and supplemental glutathione for Bulletproof practitioners.

How to Stop these Toxins from Damaging Your Performance

HNE, MDA, acrolein, and glyoxal are toxins produced from either eating a bad overall diet, too much protein (even the good kinds), and overcooked proteins and meats. Here are three steps to countering these problems:

  1. Eat the Bulletproof Diet. This minimizes your intake of polyunsaturated fats, oxidized fats, denatured proteins, and other toxins that cause inflammation, which makes more of these toxins.
  2. Follow the macronutrient guidelines from the Bulletproof Diet and aim for around 60-80% of your calories from high quality fats and oils. Also read the upcoming series on protein restriction and longevity for even more details.
  3. Cook your food correctly. This is the trickiest part of this process, but as a general recommendation, cook your foods on moderate to low heat for shorter periods of time, erring on the side of less rather than more. However, the right cooking methods really vary for almost every meat. This is why I wrote Upgraded Chef, a recipe book that teaches you exactly how to prepare your food for optimal performance and health. Including antioxidant spices is a great idea too.

High quality grass fed meat and other clean proteins are a part (up to 20%) of the Bulletproof Diet, but consuming too much or the wrong kinds can produce several powerful toxins that damage your performance. Even vegan processed junk like seitan (wheat gluten), tofurkey, and soy burgers will form the same protein and fat toxins.

The main source of these toxins for most Bulletproof practitioners is overcooked meat and animal products, which is why it’s so crucial to use the right cooking methods. Upgraded Chef shows you how to cook your food to keep toxin production to a bare minimum. It also comes with shopping lists, and a diagram of the diet so you have everything you need all in one place. If you’re interested in upgrading your weekly meal plan, click here to learn more.

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By Dave Asprey

  • frank

    On the subject of cooking temperatures, what about pressure cookers? I’ve seen the claim that because they’re sealed to air and the cook times are so short oxidation is much less than with other methods despite much higher temperatures.

    I love being able to take frozen meat put it straight in the pressure cooker and have it ready to eat in 15 minutes.

    • Churyl Zeviar

      there’s a great article about pressure cookers can be used for healthy cooking here:

      http://www.foodrenegade.com/pressure-cooking-healthy/

      • Michael A

        Great article, thank you! 🙂

    • frank

      Also, there’s the claim that the high temperatures in pressure cookers can break down mycotoxins.

  • Jon

    Dave what is your opinion on the Tony Robbins diet? He more or less tells people to avoid animal mean altogether and just go alkaline.

    • Dave Asprey

      It will not work for long periods of time and is not evidence based.

  • Jon

    Sorry, meat I meant …stupid iPad finishing my words!

  • Jake

    What about if your trying to put on muscle?
    Every body building outlet recommends that you pretty much drown yourself in protein.
    What’s a bulletproof amount of protein each day for the weight gainer?

    • Jake,

      When your body switches over from carbovore status to fat burning machine, you don’t need as much protein. Muscle maintenance is much easier when your body burns fat as its main source of energy. The reason body builders feed on so much protein is that their bodies feed off of their muscles to supply their body with glucose, since as carbovores, or near carbovores, their body is still readily dependent on glucose. When your a fat burner you don’t have to wake up in the middle of the night to drink a shake because your body is mainly feeding on its fat stores.

      It is well known that many body builders take steroids but what is less well known is that they also take insulin. To get muscle size beyond our evolutionary blueprint requires ingesting things that we aren’t programmed to eat. Even amateur body builders at the local gym will have carb feedings to shove nutrients into their muscles.

      • daniel

        Your a bit a confused by the hype of this science denying retard “dave asprey”. The world’s oldest and thus most successful body-builder, Jim Morris, is a carbovore.

  • Jurgen

    You mention ‘too much protein’, could you define this with numbers? How much is too much.

    • Jurgen

      As a side note, i now have used Bulletproof Coffee for 3 months and being a coffee geek (Dutch) i must say i am impressed with the quality. No more jitters, tension and mild headaches since drinking this. Kudos to all of you at Bulletproof, especially Dave!

      • JC

        I tried butter in my coffee! Heavy cream is much better!

  • Jack117
    • Jack117

      Mr. Asprey,
      Do you think that if food production became more efficent across the world, everybody could afford your diet or is it something that only Westerners can afford for now?

      • Jack117

        If food production became more efficient, would everybody (Westerners and non-Westerners) be able to afford your diet or are there way too many people in the world for that to be possible?

  • Biego

    First, I would like to say thank you Dave! I am following parts of the bulletproof diet and feeling amazing. I am glad you posted this article as it gives me the idea I can mitigate some problems with low heat cooking and upgraded whey. I would like to eat grassfed beef regularly but I can’t afford it. Would eating leaner cuts be the lesser of two evils in this case?

  • JasonHooper

    Awesome stuff, Dave! I will have to dig into MDA, Acrolein, and Glyoxal to learn even more about these denaturing processes in cooking. I know that it is highly dependent on the type of produce, but how do you calculate the risk to reward ratio when deciding what temperature to cook your food and for how long?

  • Wogie

    Good stuff! I would really love if you could blog about vision hacking ! 🙂

  • Corrie

    Have been exploring your site the past two weeks, and am looking forward to starting BPIF soon. Listened to the Joe Rogan podcast yesterday, and was sad to hear that you don’t reccomend dry-aged beef, because my favorite grass-fed beef ranch does just that. THEN, I was poking around your site again and found that my favorite ranch is the same one that you recommend! What’s up with that?

    • Dave Asprey

      Dry aging is ok if the species growing on the meat are ok. Fresh meat is still better for you, but Alderspring’s processor is stellar.
      Sent from an iphone. That means it’s spelled wrong…and I’m probably lost. You understand… -Dave

      • So how do you know if the processor is any good? I have a local “farm” grocer that sells oasis bird in the hand grass fed beef. I know the processor dry ages the beef 21 days. It’s a small family processor, but that’s all I know. http://www.smuckersmeats.com/

  • Chris

    Dave,

    What’s up. Great post.

    Do you have any advice for short term improvements in focus, memory and mental performance?

    I have several 4 hour exams that require a huge amount of mental effort. Aside from drinking bulletproof coffee, eating a high fat diet, and eating chocolate, any there suggestions for foods, methods, supplements or anything else?

    Thanks,
    -Chris

    • Dave Asprey

      Aniracetam and d-ribose!

      Sent from an iphone. That means it’s spelled wrong…and I’m probably lost. You understand… -Dave

      • Chris

        Thanks Dave! Are these for short term use (day of test) or consistent use? Also, any cautionary notes?

        • Melissa Jarquin

          He’s got a great podcast episode with Abel James on The Fatburning Man where he talks a lot about this. Helped me earlier today so thought I’d share in case you could find some useful info there for yourself too! 🙂

  • Daniel Hind

    Dave,
    Thanks so much for the advice, but I’m having trouble understanding how one is to get as much as 80% of one’s diet from fat alone. To me, that suggests that the majority of ‘food’ I should be consuming allows for little more than butter and MCT oil. Realistically, unless I live on bulletproof coffee and one protein-based meal per day, how does one make this practical?
    Please, if someone has a suggestion, I’d really love to know because for months now I’ve been having an incredibly hard time understanding how Fat can take such priority in a diet without correspondingly boosting Protein intake as well (via grass fed meets and fatty fishes, etc.).
    Thank you!!
    -Daniel

    • Michael A

      I posted this in response to another comment but I have managed to do it. 80% is high but 60% is very doable and Dave does say 60-80% if I am not mistaken. Personally, I eat all of my veggies creamed with Kerrygold and my diet consists almost entirely of veggies, butter, and meat (and tea!) and I hit about
      60-80% of calories from fat. I’ve got a sample day, in fact:

      BREAKFAST

      Bulletproof tea (2tbp MCT oil, 2tbp KG butter) – 400 calories – 400 from fat

      2 eggs cooked in 1/2tbp KG – 190 calories – 140 from fat, 8 from carbs, 42 from protein

      LUNCH

      Creamed kale with 2tbp KG butter – 287 calories – 200 from fat, 28 from protein, 45 from carbs

      7 Great Organic Grass-Fed hot dogs – 630 calories – 438 from fat, 192 from protein

      DINNER

      PALEO MEATLOAF

      1/2lb Grass-Fed Ground Beef – 466 calories – 306 fat, 160 protein

      1/2 small onion – 11 calories – 9 net carb calories, 2 protein

      1/4 cup almond meal – 171 calories – 135 fat, 8 net carb calories, 28 protein

      1/2 cup crushed tomatoes – 32 calories – 24 net carb calories, 8 protein

      1/2 tbp maple syrup – 27 calories – all carbs

      1/2 tbp erythritol – 0 calories

      TOTALS
      2158 calories – 1619 from fat (75%), 418 from protein (19%), 121 from carbs (6%)

      Needless to say, I am never hungry when I eat like this. I am a 25 year-old 5′ 9″ guy, 150lb. and have been eating this way for about a year now. My HDL was dangerously low before this diet and is now 70. My blood pressure has decreased from being high, as has my C-Reactive Protein. My LDL has increased but what matters is HDL:LDL ratio and mine is now fantastic. My resting heart rate is in the high 60’s (athletic range). I do not exercise. I fall asleep within 5 minutes of laying down every night, usually in 3 minutes according to my Zeo. I do not feel perfect and I am not perfect but the Bulletproof diet has been an enormous boon.

      Though I will say that some of what Dave suggests seems to not be backed up by science (earthing mats, for example). Overall, however, Dave’s advice is free and you and I can pick and choose what we do and do not follow so I am not complaining! Hope this helps!!

  • Amon Ra-y

    Hi Dave, a quick question: Do you have any concern over potential neurotoxic effects of L-Glutamine? I am aware that you take 10 grams per day and would like myself to start taking some but I fear excess Glutamic acid.

    • madeleinefulton@yahoo.com

      I have the same question! And also in regards to BCAAs? Want to experiment with one or both, as an athlete but after reading this I’m scared I’m already consuming too much protein.

  • Don’t you need a proportion of greens with protein to avoid calcification of your organs?

    • Jay

      I think you may be confusing vitamin K1 with K2.

  • Lothario

    I too have never understood how you’re supposed to get the majority of your calories from fat, while keeping protein intake to 20% or less. I mean, on your 4,500 calorie diet, you would have to consume between 2,700 – 3,600 calories from butter or oil alone. This seems absurd as well as impossible. Even on a more regular 2,500 calorie diet, you’d need at least 1,500 calories directly from butter or oil. Do you just eat straight sticks of butter, since there is a biological limit on how much MCT oil your body can process? The only other advice I’ve heard you give in regards to this is blending butter and vegetables and throwing the mix in to cook the rest of your vegetables (which still seems woefully shy of a 1,500 calorie-from-fat target), as well as just making sure you top your meats with a pat of butter (but this involves taking in more proteins at the same time, when protein intake must be limited to 20%).

    This question seems to come up so often – any way you could just give a one-time detailed answer that lays out 1 day of typical bulletproof eating that includes a caloric breakdown from each of the food groups so we could actually get an idea of how, specifically, you could possibly attain 60-80% calories from pure fat while restricting protein to 20%?

    Thanks a million!

    • Michael A

      Personally, I eat all of my veggies creamed with Kerrygold and my diet consists almost entirely of veggies, butter, and meat (and tea!) and I hit about 80% of calories from fat. I’ve got a sample day, in fact:

      BREAKFAST

      Bulletproof tea (2tbp MCT oil, 2tbp KG butter) – 400 calories – 400 from fat

      2 eggs cooked in 1/2tbp KG – 190 calories – 140 from fat, 8 from carbs, 42 from protein

      LUNCH

      Creamed kale with 2tbp KG butter – 287 calories – 200 from fat, 28 from protein, 45 from carbs

      7 Great Organic Grass-Fed hot dogs – 630 calories – 438 from fat, 192 from protein

      DINNER

      PALEO MEATLOAF

      1/2lb Grass-Fed Ground Beef – 466 calories – 306 fat, 160 protein

      1/2 small onion – 11 calories – 9 net carb calories, 2 protein

      1/4 cup almond meal – 171 calories – 135 fat, 8 net carb calories, 28 protein

      1/2 cup crushed tomatoes – 32 calories – 24 net carb calories, 8 protein

      1/2 tbp maple syrup – 27 calories – all carbs

      1/2 tbp erythritol – 0 calories

      TOTALS
      2158 calories – 1619 from fat (75%), 418 from protein (19%), 121 from carbs (6%)

      Hope this helps!!

      • THis all sounds delish!
        Where’d you get the Paleo meatloaf recipe?

    • Kieran

      Even if the protein is the larger part of a piece of meat by weight, there’s a lot of water in there. The fat is much denser and will make up make up a larger part of the overall calories than the protein.

      Eating well marbled or fatty cuts, cooked or seasoned with oil or butter, you’d be getting plenty of fat to protein!

    • heartgrowsfonda

      Look up ketogenic diet or “fat fast” for the answer to your question of how to get fat up and carb/protein down. That option isn’t very paleo, it’s mostly used by people desperate to fix their painful neurological conditions. Like me, I have hemiplagic migraine. Youtube’s Dr. Kossoff has a long video outlining his program for kids with epilepsy who use a much higher fat version of Atkins that I started out with. I find the discussion on this page very useful. I think most websites classify these substances as “AGEs” and never tell you the names of the chemicals. Nice of him to name them and describe the effects. Burned meat, or burned tofu steak is horrendous for health. Don’t get me started about burned deep fried yummilicious seitan (gluten “meat” chunks). Makes you insane in the membrane.

  • beccy smith

    HI Dave,
    What do you think about the blood type diet? My naturopath told me according to my blood type I shouldn’t eat red meat and tomatoes.
    Also, I was told I need to stop coffee because it’s hormone disruptive and is effecting my cortisol levels, stressing my adrenal glands and making me estrogen dominant. Have you ever come across this or heard of it? I love bulletproof coffee but I am constantly stressed so I’m trying to figure out what to do.
    Thanks so much

    • Michael A

      As far as I know there is absolutely no science behind the blood type diet. The best thing you can do for yourself is remove all potential allergens from your diet (think GAPS diet). Then re-introduce potentially problematic foods one at a time. One week, reintroduce nightshades (tomatoes, potatoes, and eggplants all fall under this category). If you are feeling crappier than usual, you probably should not eat them. It’s as simple as that.

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  • squeeg

    Paleo isn’t low-carb or low-fat, jackass. Yes, we eat “specific” carbs and fats, but I assure you, my fist-sized meat portion and plate full of vegetables is NOT high-protein. Get your facts straight, blogger.

    • Michael A

      Paleo is LOWER carb than the standard American diet. MUCH lower, in fact. Anyways, Dave doesn’t claim to be promoting a paleo diet, only a paleo-esque diet.

      More importantly, getting angry and cursing only makes you seem foolish and stops any actual discussion. I understand you are upset that you believe Dave is dissing Paleo but getting angry isn’t making you any healthier.

      • squeeg

        You consider “jackass” cursing?

        • JC

          OK! It’s name-calling! It’s putting another person down, and making yourself superior! Whatever you want to call it, it’s arrogant, demeaning, and not nice! SHMUCK! 🙂

    • Seth Hill

      Agreed, calling a complete stranger a jackass only makes you seem like a jerk and frankly… uninformed. Clearly you know nothing of Dave or his research. Before you attack someone you might educate yourself a bit on the context from which they are speaking. Perhaps then you can be invited, alongside Dave, to present at Paleo FX since you’re such an expert.

    • madeleinefulton@yahoo.com

      I don’t think the focus of this article is what defines a paleo diet, necessarily, especially as there are so many different strands of paleo, and it’s not productive to argue, or be offended by, semantics. Further, the article talks almost more about oxidized fats and denatured proteins from overcooking than it does about simply too high protein consumption. I’d think that eating cooked meats is pretty universal in the paleo sphere. Don’t lose sight of the forrest for the trees.

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  • Lisa

    That is one strong statement to declare that Steve Jobs died from being a vegetarian. Absolutely the human body does NOT need meat to be well or to be an Olympic athlete (there are many examples). My belief is that our ancestors ate very little meat–when they could get it at all. EVERYONE should be concerned about animal factory farming. If you chose to eat meat, either raise it yourself or hunt it like our ancestors. The welfare and respect for animals should be at the forefront of all of our minds.

    • JC

      About our ancestors: Before hominids stood erect, they were large abdomen plant eaters, very slow, and not too intelligent; much like a cow! Complete human nutrition is difficult and also impossible to obtain from plants alone! Modern human ancestors stood erect precisely to run fast, to hunt and eat meat, that is a much more efficient way to obtain nutrition than gathering fruits and vegetables! It is also not limited to seasons, as are plants as food! Human ancestors got meat initially by eating leftovers, then by scaring the predatory animal off his kill, in numbers, much the way hyenas take a kill away from lions! Eating meat, and the associated fat content, increased brain size and made us smarter, decreased our stomach and intestine size, because it is much easier to digest and obtain nutrients from meat than from plants; and we are still physically naturally meat eaters. So sorry to my Vegan buddies; but your philosophical beliefs are all wrong! The latest anthropological wisdom is that our canine teeth lessened because we became tool users, and no longer needed them for ripping and tearing, as do other predatory animals. Be not deceived, humans are the most successful predatory animals on the planet! Veganism is misguided, uninformed, and obviously not our natural condition, as evidenced by the fact that essential nutrients such as vitamin B12 and EPA and DHA essential fatty acids cannot be obtained from plant sources! And, the food pyramid is upside down! Final word: Never trust the advice of anyone who is extreme in any way! History has proven that moderation and generalism is always the most successful philosophy! Extremes rarely survive unless they are in a very specialized ecological niche, and became extreme precisely to survive in it!

      • cook

        Note she said vegetarian and not vegan. So your argument does not stand. Just like over the top vegans you are in a cult.

      • Bob Barker

        B12 is produced by bacteria. It’s in the dirt. In the ancient world, bacteria was everywhere. Our modern world and food sources, not to mention our water is much more sanitized, but you can’t keep the bacteria and the resulting B12 produced inside the guts of ruminant animals like cows out of the meat during slaughter.

        Vegans need a B12 supplement (which, again, coming from bacteria, can be farmed and produced without animals), but everything else you need is freely available and abundant from plant-based sources. Over the age of 50, everyone, meat-eaters included, are encouraged to take a B12 supplement, because absorption slows after about the age of 50. Most vegans just add fortified nutritional yeast to their diet, which contains an ample amount of B12. For those who don’t think that’s enough, a sublingual B12 tablet once a week is more than sufficient to account for any kind of B12 deficiency. It’s also added to some plant milks.

        We may be adaptable eaters, but there is nothing to indicate that by and large, anyone ate meat at *anything* like the current rate enjoyed by the Standard American Diet. Look at the traditional Chinese diet, the diet of the masses. Rice and vegetables, with occasional small bits of meat. The Okinawans enjoyed the longest lifespans in the world because their traditional diet was almost entirely vegan.

        Millions of Indians live as vegetarians or vegans.

        DHA can be produced from algae, and since it’s not extracted from fish it also avoids metals and other toxins that are naturally resident in our polluted oceans. Of course, our body converts ALA sources into DHA, but you can easily supplement with that as well, from non-animal-based sources.

        Additionally, all of our great ape cousins subsist on a diet that is at least 98% derived from plant-based sources. The Chimpanzee, our closest cousin, it’s about 99%, with the other 1% consisting mostly of termites (which are an ample source of B12, by the way).

        They also have larger canines than we do, mostly for defensive purposes. Not for tearing and shredding into raw meat.

        If we were to eat meat at a ratio equivalent to what our ape relatives, and our biology indicates we should, we’d eat about a baby carrot’s worth of meat a day, or less.

  • Justin Rojas

    does cooking meat via boiling in water, steaming, roasting vs frying, produce less oxidised protein/fats?

    • madeleinefulton@yahoo.com

      Like Dave said it depends on the type of meat, but lower heat, adding liquid to the cooking process, and not cooking too long are good ideas to reduce toxic byproducts.

      • JC

        Low heat, cooked rare tastes better and is more tender; easier to chew and digest, and more nutritious; and much closer to how animals eat, raw, as long as you have tender meat in the first place! Remember, cooking kills all nutrients except minerals.

  • Richard J D’Souza

    So the message here is to eat a a variety of meats in moderation and in moderate amounts.

  • JC

    MCT OIL? WHY? Coconut oil is much better! It has the world’s highest amount, 50%, of Lauric acid, the amazing antimicrobial component of mothers milk, that contains much less. Lauric acid is the most important component of coconut oil! MCT oil has none! So, any person who can think clearly, is not brain dead, can see how coconut oil is far superior to MCT oil, that is man made, not natural, and not even close! See this reference: http://healthimpactnews.com/2014/mct-oil-vs-coconut-oil-the-truth-exposed/

  • cook

    You people are in a mad cult just like vegans

  • Michael Attanasio

    Then by your logic, different blood types should be susceptible to different diseases and certain blood types should show more autoimmune diseases. As far as I am aware, neither of these statements is true.