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Low-Carb Shrimp Pad Thai With Shirataki Noodles

By: Bulletproof Staff

Low-Carb Shrimp Pad Thai With Shirataki Noodles

Pad thai with shirataki noodles recipe & content provided by Veronica Culver

I’m a big fan of Asian food. I’m also a big fan of noodles and finding low-carb, keto alternatives that I can enjoy without all of the addicting starchy carbs, sugar spikes, and weight gain that accompany traditional grain pastas and noodles. Shirataki noodles are one of my favorite keto-friendly pasta alternatives. They look and taste incredibly similar to traditional pasta, yet have no carbs, sugars, etc. They only take a few minutes to prep, so I find them just as easy to make as regular pasta. (I’ve included the prep instructions in the recipe below.)

Before we get to the pad thai recipe, let me address the elephant in the room. Yes, shirataki noodles have a distinctive smell when you first open the package and drain them. They tend to have what some might describe as a fishy aroma, even though they’re not made from fish at all. In fact, they are made from the konjac plant, native to Asia. The plant is comprised of mostly water and a small amount of soluble fiber, making it naturally low-carb and gluten-free. The prep takes care of any odor so no need to worry about that at all.

Now, to the recipe: I’ve created a light keto version of shrimp pad thai using shirataki noodles and a delicious and bright sauce that’s easy to make. The sauce is delicate and fresh, yet full-flavored. This dish tastes great whether it’s enjoyed hot off the stove or as leftovers eaten cold right from the fridge. It makes a wonderful option for your weekly meal preps or as an easy weeknight meal.

Low-Carb Shrimp Pad Thai With Shirataki Noodles

Keto Pad Thai With Shirataki NoodlesStart to Finish: 20 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 7-ounce packages shirataki fettuccini noodles
  • 18 medium-size, wild-caught shrimp
  • 2 pastured eggs, beaten
  • 1 ½ tablespoons Brain Octane Oil, divided
  • 2 tablespoons coconut aminos
  • 1 lime, juiced and divided
  • 1 teaspoon cashew butter
  • 1 clove garlic, pressed or finely minced
  • ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • ¼ cup cilantro
  • 2 green onions, chopped
  • sea salt
  • 4 cashews, crushed (optional garnish)

Instructions:

  1. Prepare shirataki noodles according to package directions (rinse for 15 seconds, then boil for 2 minutes in a pot of boiling water, then drain the noodles and place them in a dry skillet (no oil) over medium heat and “dry roast” them for 1 minute). Set aside.
  2. In a small bowl, mix ¾ tablespoon Brain Octane Oil, coconut aminos, ½ of the lime juice, cashew butter, garlic and crushed red pepper. Set aside.
  3. Heat a large skillet over medium heat and add remaining ¾ tablespoon Brain Octane Oil, shrimp and a pinch of sea salt. Cook for approximately 1 ½ to 2 minutes each side.
  4. Move the shrimp to the side of the skillet and add the beaten eggs to the open area of the skillet. Quickly cook the eggs to a soft scramble, about 1 minute.
  5. Add shirataki noodles, sauce mixture, cilantro and green onions to skillet with shrimp and eggs. Toss everything together and mix well. Heat until warmed through.
  6. To finish, drizzle the rest of the fresh lime juice over entire skillet, taste for seasoning and add sea salt and/or more crushed red pepper if desired. Garnish with optional crushed cashews and serve.

Serves: 3

Nutritional Information (Per Serving):

  • Calories: 180
  • Protein: 12g
  • Carbs: 5
  • Fiber: 0g
  • Sugar: 3g
  • Sugar Alcohol: 0g
  • Net Carbs: 5g
  • Fat: 12g
  • Saturated Fat: 8g
  • Polyunsaturated: 1g
  • Monounsaturated: 2g
  • Trans fat: 0g
  • Cholesterol: 179g
  • Sodium: 283mg
  • Potassium: 203mg
  • Vitamin A: 7%
  • Vitamin C: 10%
  • Calcium: 5%
  • Iron: 22%

Notes on suspect ingredients: Garlic and onions are in the suspect category of the Bulletproof Diet, because they inhibit alpha brain waves and could affect your mood – and depending on where you get them, could be moldy. For that reason, it’s not recommended that you eat garlic or onions often. Red pepper is a member of the nightshade family, and you may be sensitive to it. It is also almost as likely as black pepper to have high amounts of mold toxins in it, so quality matters when buying.